Common Read 2012

May 3, 2012

Cover of Alexie's novelThe Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie is SDSU’s Common Read book for 2012.  The choice was revealed during a special party at the library on May 1st. Attendees enjoyed refreshments and received free copies of the book courtesy of the library.

This is the fourth year for SDSU’s Common Read.  Previous selections were Outcasts United, Mountains Beyond Mountains, and Three Cups of Tea.  Many students enrolled in First Year Seminar courses will be reading and discussing the current selection this fall.   A slate of activities centered on the book and its subject matter will be announced later.

Linda Kott
Information Services Librarian

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Winter Festivals, Part 2

December 12, 2011

Library staffers Sandy Linn, Anne Jerke, and Kathy Gustafson have been busy creating more displays featuring winter festivals.  Look for displays on the Chinese New Year and Pancha Ganapati, the Hindu Family Festival of Giving, on the main level of the library.  Head downstairs to see a display on the winter solstice.  Check out the bibliographies below if you are interested in reading about the festivals.  Please ask a librarian for assistance in locating materials or if you would like more information.  Happy Holidays!

Chinese New Year
The Moon Year; a record of Chinese customs and festivals
By Juliet Bredon and Igor Mitrophanow
DS721 .B7m

Pancha Ganapali
The Blackwell Companion to Hinduism
by Gavin Flood, ed.
BL1202 .B72 2005

Hinduism: a very short introduction
by Kim Knott
Electronic Resource

Winter Solstice
Mysteries and discoveries of archaeoastronomy from Giza to Easter Island
by Giulio Magli
GN799. A8 M3413 2009

Astronomy and empire in the ancient Andes: The cultural origins of Inca sky watching.
by Brian S. Bauer and David S. Dearborn
F3429.3 .C14 B38 1995

Stonehenge decoded
by Gerald S. Hawkins
DA142 .H3s 1965

General
Holiday,  festivals , and celebrations of the world dictionary: detailing more than 2,000 observances from all  50 states and more than 100 nations
ed. by Helene Henderson and Sue Ellen Thompson
Reference  GT3925  .T46  1997

Multicultural projects index: things to make and do to celebrate festivals, cultures, and holidays around the world
by Mary Anne Pilger
LC1099  .P55  1992

Linda Kott
Information Services Librarian


Winter Festivals

December 7, 2011

Come to the library to see displays highlighting winter festivals.  On the upper level of the library you will find displays on Hanukkah and Christmas Around the World. Look for a display on  Kwanzaa on the main level. If you are interested in reading more about the various winter festivals a short bibliography of books, along with their call numbers, follows. Ask a librarian for assistance in locating these materials or if you would like to look for more information on the topic. Check back here for more updates about displays at the library.

Hanukkah
Festivals of the Jewish Year; a modern interpretation and guide
by Theodor Herzl Gaster
BM690  .G3f

Hanukkah: the  feast of lights
compiled  and edited by Emily Solis-Cohen, Jr.
BM695  .H356

Christmas Around the World
Christmas Customs Around the World
by Herbert H. Wernecke
GT4985  .W44  1959  Agricultural Heritage Museum

The Book of Christmas Folklore
by Tristram Potter Coffin
GT4985  C546

The Story of Christmas; its Growth and Development from the Earliest Times
by Michael Harrison
GT4985  H3s

Kwanzaa
Kwanzaa: everything you always wanted to know but didn’t know where to ask
by Cedric McClester
E185.86  .M39  1985

Kwanzaa and me: a teacher’s story
by Vivian Gussin Paley
LB1140.3  .P356  1995

Kwanzaa: an African-American celebration of culture and cooking
by Eric V. Copage
TX715  .C7865  1991

Linda Kott
Information Services Librarian


Constitution Day/Congress Week

September 9, 2011

This year is the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  It’s an appropriate time to revisit the documents and institutions that sustain our country in the wake of a national tragedy like 9/11 and other challenges.  Constitution Day, September 17, and Congress Week, September 12-16, provide us with that opportunity.

Constitution Day celebrates the signing of the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787.  Established by Congress in 2004, Constitution Day stresses the importance of the Constitution as a document that guides our government and protects citizens’ rights.  You can read the Constitution online or come in to the Government Documents office on the lower level of the library for a free copy.

The Association of Centers for the Study of Congress (ACSC) created Congress Week to coincide with Constitution Day.  ACSC encourages the study of Congress and its key role in the government as established by the Constitution.  Our own Thomas A. Daschle Congressional Research Study, located within the Special Collections area of Briggs Library, provides a unique resource for the study of Congress.  Here the public can access papers from Daschle’s twenty-six years in Congress.

The staff at Briggs Library encourages you to explore our resources and learn more about the U.S. Constitution and Congress.  The library is a member of the Federal Depository Library Program, and has been since 1889, so we provide free access to congressional, executive, and judicial publications.  For more information on this program connect to our Government Documents Web page. 

You can also come to the library to see displays on the lower and main levels.  Access our History and Political Science Research Guides.  Search library resources such as our online catalog and databases to get more information.  Also, feel free to contact a librarian about the Constitution, Congress, or any other research interests.

 Linda Kott
Information Services Librarian


Summer Information

May 12, 2011

You are invited to use the library this summer.  SDSU students who are not taking summer classes may still check out materials as long as they are enrolled for the fall semester.  Those not enrolled at SDSU can check out materials with a guest card if they are a South Dakota resident and sixteen years of age or older.

The library is an excellent place to explore information in the summer.  On the main level of the library you will find newspapers, popular magazines and a recent fiction collection.  We have many computers available and there is usually no waiting during the summer months.  Our air conditioning is so super-powered that staff members often bring sweaters to work.

Check the Library Hours page to see when we are open.  You can access the Library Hours page from the library’s home page by clicking on About the Library. The Library Hours page will also let you know when a librarian is on duty.

 Have a great summer!

 Linda Kott
Information Services Librarian

Recent Fiction Collection


Challenged Books

April 20, 2011

The American Library Association (ALA) recently published its Top Ten List of the Most Frequently Challenged Books of 2010.  The most challenged book of 2010 was And Tango Makes Three, a children’s book about two male penguins raising a chick in the Central Park Zoo.  Reasons for challenging the book included “unsuited for age group,” “religious viewpoint,” and “homosexuality.”    

 Barbara Jones, director of ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom, notes that “While we firmly support the right of every reader to choose or reject a book for themselves or their families, those objecting to a particular book should not be given the power to restrict other readers’ right to access and read that book.”  Jones goes on to say: “As members of a pluralistic and complex society, we must have free access to a diverse range of viewpoints on the human condition in order to foster critical thinking and understanding.  We must protect one of the most precious of our fundamental rights – the freedom to read” (“And Tango Makes Three”…, 2011, para. 4)

 You can exercise your freedom to read by reading challenged books, including the following four books challenged in 2010 and held in our collection.  Check the library catalog to see if the books are checked out or on the shelf.  Ask a librarian for help in using the catalog or any library resource.

  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
    Recent Fiction/Main Level PS3551.L35774 A27 2007
  • Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    Upper Level PR6015.U9 B65
  • Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By In America by Barbara Ehrenreich
    Upper Level HD4918 .E375 2001
  • Twilight by Stephanie Meyer
    Recent Fiction/Main Level PS3613.E979 T84 2005

Linda Kott
Information Services Librarian

 References

“And Tango Makes Three” waddles its way back to number one slot as America’s most frequently challenged book. (2011, April 11). American Libraries. Retrieved from http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/


Festival of Cultures

March 25, 2011
Librarian Mary Kraljic at Past Festival of Cultures / Photo by Patty Vick

Briggs Library staff members will be hosting a booth at SDSU’s 29th Annual Festival of Cultures.  We hope you will join us in Frost Arena on Friday 1 April anytime from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Our booth will highlight library resources related to culture.  You can explore world cultures in more depth by visiting the library in-person or online.  Following are just a few ways to dive into the topic.

  • Peruse the library’s collection of local, regional, and world newspapers found on the main level of the library.
  • Use the library’s catalog to find records for books, government documents, DVD’s, and electronic books.
  • Consult resources in the library’s Reference Collection on the library’s main level, including multivolume works on Culture and Customs organized by country and Food Culture organized by country or region.
  • Use one of our many databases to find articles in magazines, journals, or newspapers.
  • Explore Government Information, including international information.
  • Ask a librarian to help with your research.  Consult with a librarian in person at the Information Services Desk or click on the Ask Us link on the library’s homepage for information on connecting by phone, e-mail or instant messaging. 

 Linda Kott
Information Service Librarian