Learn About Nepal

February 10, 2011

Nepal Night will begin at 6 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 13, in the Volstorff Ballroom of the Student Union. Hosted by SDSU’s Nepalese Student Association, the event offers an opportunity to sample Nepalese cuisine and culture.

If you want to learn even more about Nepal, remember the library offers many great resources. One place is to look for information is a general database like EBSCOhost MegaFILE, which is linked on the library’s homepage. I looked for information on Nepal’s culture and retrieved many helpful articles. According an article by Bailey, Nepali is the official language of Nepal, but its people speak over fifty languages and dialects (People & Culture sec.). Check out the accuracy of this fact with the hosts of Nepal Night or by comparing other sources.

Works Cited

Bailey, Ellen. “Nepal.” Our World: Nepal (2010): 1-6. EBSCO MegaFILE. Web. 10 Feb. 2011.

Linda Kott
Information Services Librarian

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READ SPEAK KNOW

September 28, 2009

bbwbadge_smCelebrate the Freedom to Read during  Banned Books Week , September 26-October 3, 2009. Banned Books Week annually celebrates the importance of the First Amendment, the freedom to read, the freedom to access information and the freedom to express ideas without fear. Intellectual freedom provides the foundation for a free and democratic society to access and express multiple viewpoints regardless of popularity.

Librarians at SDSU are committed to intellectual freedom and unfettered access to information. In celebration of Banned books week, the library features displays on the Main Level and the Lower Level. Check out the Main Level East hallway display case and the Table Display in the lobby near the Information Services Office which includes the 2008-2009 Challenged Books List and examples of books that have been challenged in libraries, schools, bookstores, and communities. The Lower Level display outside the Government Documents Office explores federal publications related to the freedoms protected under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; of the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

See the American Library Association’s Issues & Advocacy pages for more information about Banned and Challenged books http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/index.cfm.

Vickie Mix, Government Documents Librarian